Free Experiments

  1. STEM TASK: CAMOUFLAGING ART (All Ages)

    STEM TASK: CAMOUFLAGING ART
    ALL AGES

    What is an adaptation?

    An adaptation is a physical or behavioral characteristic that an organism has developed over time to increase its chances of survival in a particular environment.

    What is camouflage?

    Camouflage is a method of making oneself hard to detect. An animal may be trying to conceal its appearance, sound, or scent. The term is used most often to describe an animal blending into its surroundings. Camouflage is an adaptation.

    What are some different types of camouflage?

    Camo 1

    The most common type of camouflage is background matching. That means the animal is blending into its surroundings and is therefore more difficult to see. This

    Read more »
  2. Balloon Powered Car

    Balloon Powered Car:

    Balloon Powered Car

    Design a car that is able to move the furthest using the power of just one balloon. Materials might include bricks such as Lego, or recycled materials, or a set amount of materials.

    Read more »
  3. Preserve A Spider Web

    Preserve A Spider Web

    Preserve A Spider Web

    Spiders are not just creepy and crawly, they are truly one of nature’s great artists.  Spiders produce silk that they use to catch bugs, usually by spinning a beautiful web.

    In this activity, be a spider scientist and capture and preserve a delicate spiderweb to study.

    Suitable for kids aged 10+ with parental supervision.

    You Need:

    • Empty spiderweb
    • Talcum powder
    • Black construction paper
    • Hair spray

    What to do:

    1. Head outside, in the backyard, school ground or nature trail in search of an unoccupied spider web. To find out if the web is empty, tap it very lightly. You will see the spider move if it is occupied, and you will need to find another web to preserve. Look carefully in tall grass and bushes. 
    Read more »
  4. Mouldy Bread

    Mouldy Bread

    The Mouldy Bread Experiment

    Learning Objectives:

    -      Students will develop and/or refine their skills in designing and conducting experiments.

    -      Students will understand the factors that promote and prevent the growth of mold on bread.

     

    Equipment required (per student or pair of students):

    -      2 slices of bread each cut into halves.

    -      4 small ziplock bags

    -      4 sticky labels and pen

    -      Access to water, a fridge and perhaps a toaster (optional)

    Some moldy bread in a sealed bag for demonstration purposes.

    Procedure:

    Show the mouldy bread to the students to prompt a discussion. (You could give it a little backstory, e.g. ‘I

    Read more »
  5. Explosive Cream Container

    Explosive Cream Container

    If you thought vinegar and bicarb were only good for making messy, oozy volcanoes, think again! Turn an empty cream container into an exciting, explosive rocket with this classic acid/base reaction.

    Suitable for ages 13 +, best used as a demonstration because of the speed and danger of the projectile

    You Need:

    • ¼ cup of vinegar
    • 600ml empty, clean cream container
    • 1 tablespoon of bicarb powder

    What to do:

    1. Add approximately ¼ cup of vinegar (acid) to a 600ml empty, clean cream container.
    2. Then, add one heaped tablespoon of bicarb (base).
    3. Quickly push the cream lid on, and point the container away
    Read more »
  6. Human Scale Model of the Solar System

    Create a human sized scale model of the solar system with your students.

    Learning Objectives:

    • For students to develop an understanding of the positions of the planets in the solar system, both relative to each other, and also their position and distance from the sun.
    • For students to gain a practical meaning of the words ‘rotation’ and ‘revolution’ and how those words apply in the context of the movement of planets.

    You Need:

    • A large open space, such as a park or football field

    • A long measuring tape (such as one used to mark out a sporting field). 

    • Possibly also

    Read more »
  7. Rubber Egg

    Rubber Egg

    Rubber Egg

    Soak a hard-boiled egg in vinegar to transform it into a rubbery egg that can bounce like a ball

    Suitable for kids aged 4+ with parental supervision

    You Need:
    • Hard-boiled egg
    • Glass or jar, big enough to hold the egg
    • Vinegar
    What to do:
    1. Place the hard-boiled egg in the glass or jar.
    2. Pour enough vinegar into the jar to completely cover the egg. Look closely, what do you see? Can you see some tiny bubbles start to form on the shell? Why?
    3. When the shell has completely dissolved, after about 3 days or so, remove the egg from the jar and gently rinse it with tap water.
    Read more »
  8. Disappearing Ghost Crystals

    Disappearing Ghost Crystals

    Disappearing Ghost Crystals

    Watch these hard crystals swell and grow into jelly-like pieces with water. Then amaze your friends when they disappear in water, or add some food colouring for cool effects. Welcome to the amazing world of superabsorbent polyemers!

    Suitable for kids aged 5+ with parental supervision.

    CAUTION
    Ghost crystals are generally considered non-toxic and are safe for use around young children unless ingested. If ghost crystals are swallowed do not give liquids. Seek medical advice.

    You Need:
    • Water absorbing crystals (available from your local nursery or garden supply centre)
    • Transparent cup, beaker or glass
    • Water
    • Food colouring
    Read more »
  9. Lava Lamp

    Lava Lamp

    Make your own hypnotic lava lamp with oil and water and a secret ingredient that makes it fizz and bubble.

    Suitable for kids aged 5+ with parental supervision.

    CAUTION
    Remember Alka-Seltzer tablets are a medicine, do not ingest. Read the packet instructions for more information.

    You Need:
    • An empty soft drink bottle with cap, or clear jar/container with a lid
    • Vegetable oil
    • Alka-Seltzer tablets (from the supermarket)
    • Food colouring
    • Water
    What to do:
    1. Fill the bottle (or container) about full with vegetable oil.
    2. Carefully fill the rest of the bottle/container with water (nearly to
    Read more »
  10. Ink Chromatography

    Ink Chromatography

    Ink Chromatography Is black really black?

    Separate out all the colours that make up a black felt pen using a special technique called chromatography.

    Suitable for kids aged 7+

    You Need:
    • Filter or blotting paper (a coffee filter works well) cut into strips (approx. 1.5cm wide and just short of the length of the cup)
    • Transparent glass or plastic cup
    • Icy pole stick
    • 2 x black felt pens
    • Water
    What to do:
    1. Take a pen and draw a horizontal line near the bottom of two strips of filter paper. Use a different pen for each strip. You can test more than two pens on other strips if you
    Read more »