Electricity

  1. Levitating orb

    Levitating orb

    Spook your friends out with this LEVITATING orb!

    A fun science trick that explores electricity - all you need is 5 minutes and a few dollars!

    Suitable for kids aged 5+

    You Need:
    • 2.5cm wide PVC Pipe about 60cm long.
    • Thin Mylar tinsel for Christmas trees. (l millimeter wide)
    • A head of clean, dry hair
    • Scissors

    What to do:
    1. Arrange 6 strands of mylar together and tie them together in a knot at one end.
    2. Tie them together again about
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  2. Bending Water

    Bending Water

    An easy and fun way to learn about static electricity!

    Suitable for kids aged 5+

    You Need:
    • A nylon (plastic) comb
    • A narrow stream of water from a tap
    • A head of clean, dry hair

    What to do:
    1. Turn on the tap and slowly turn down the water until you have a VERY thin stream of water flowing.
    2. Take the plastic comb and brush it through your hair at least ten times.
    3. Now slowly bring the comb close the the running water, (without actually touching the water) If all goes well, the stream
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  3. Conductive Play-Dough

    Conductive Play-Dough

    Replace wires with play dough and circuit building becomes a snack for tiny learners. Watch them figure it all out and you'll see their little faces light up! up

    Suitable for kids aged 5+ with the help of an adult

    For Conductive Play-Dough You Will Need:
    • 1 cup Water
    • 1 1/2 cups Flour
    • 1/4 cup Salt
    • 3 Tbsp. Cream of Tartar (or 9 tablespoons of lemon juice)
    • 1 Tbsp. Vegetable Oil
    • Food Coloring (optional)



    For Circuit You Will Need:
    • battery pack
    • batteries
    • light emitting diodes/LEDS
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  4. Balloon Fun

    Balloon Fun

    Stick a balloon to the wall and watch your hair stand on end.

    Suitable for kids aged 4+

    You Need:

    • Balloon
    • Piece of fabric (wool works best)

    What to do:

    1. Blow-up and tie the balloon.
    2. Rub it about 20 times with the piece of fabric.
    3. Hold the balloon near the wall and watch it stick. You may need to rub the balloon again with the fabric if it doesnt work the first time.
    4. Rub the balloon about 20 times again with a piece of fabric.
    5. Hold the balloon near your hair and watch it stand on end.

    Why is it so?

    Just like in the plastic straw experiment, rubbing the balloon with the piece of fabric gives it an electrical charge. The electrical charge has the power to attract things. The wall is too heavy to move towards the balloon so the balloon moves towards it. Hair is much lighter and moves towards the balloon.

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  5. Propeller and Globe Circuit

    Propeller and Globe Circuit

    Can you get the propeller and globe working together?

    Suitable for kids aged 7+, with adult supervision

    CAUTION

    • The light globe is glass and misuse may cause it to break, resulting in sharp pieces that could cut skin. Use carefully.
    • Do not hold the wire on the battery for long periods without removing it. The wire and/or battery terminal may get hot.
    • Do not put spinning propeller near peoples faces or hair. Hair could get tangled.

    You Need:

    What to do:

    1. Before you start, ensure the globe is screwed into holder and the two wires
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  6. In A Spin

    In A Spin

    Get a propeller to spin in two different directions working like a propeller and a fan. Suitable for kids aged 7+, with adult supervision

    CAUTION

    • Do not put spinning propeller near peoples faces or hair. Hair could get tangled.
    • Do not hold the wire on the battery for long periods without removing it. The wire and/or battery terminal may get hot.

    You Need:

    • Propeller
    • 9V motor
    • Battery
    • Short electrical wire x 2

    What to do:

    1. Attach the propeller to the 9V motor by pushing the motors spindle into the hole at the back of the propeller. Make sure its on tightly.
    2. Thread one end of a piece of stripped copper wire through the hole in the square metal ring on the motor. Twist the copper wire in on itself to hold it in place. The copper wire (not the plastic coating) needs to be in contact with the square metal ring on the motor for electricity to flow and
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  7. Light It Up

    Light It Up

    Make an electrical circuit to light a bulb Suitable for kids aged 7+, with adult supervision

    CAUTION

    • The light globe is glass and misuse may cause it to break, resulting in sharp pieces that could cut skin. Use carefully.
    • Do not hold the wire on the battery for long periods without removing it. The wire and/or battery terminal may get hot.

    You Need:

    • Small globe
    • Globe holder
    • Battery
    • Short electrical wire x 2

    What to do:

    1. Screw the light globe into the holder.
    2. Attach the end of a stripped piece of wire to one side of the globe holder, by threading it through the metal hole and twisting it in on itself to hold it in place. The copper wire (not the plastic coating) needs to be in contact with the globe holder for electricity to flow and power the bulb.
    3. Attach the end of another stripped piece of wire to the other side of the globe holder
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  8. Static Magic

    Static Magic

    Use static electricity to make a magic wand. Suitable for kids aged 4+

    You Need:

    • Polystyrene ball
    • Plastic straw
    • Piece of fabric (wool works best)

    What to do:

    1. Wrap the piece of fabric around the plastic straw and rub up and down about 20 times.
    2. Place the now magic straw above the foam ball and watch it mysteriously jump to the straw.
    3. If it doesnt work the first time, rub the straw with the fabric and try again. Be patient.
    4. Try a different piece of fabric. Does this work better?

    Why is it so?

    When the straw is rubbed with the fabric it becomes electrified and has the power to attract things, like the polystyrene ball. This is static electricity at work. Read about how things become electrified below.

    Super Charged

    It is thought the ancient Greeks discovered electricity when they found that the mineral amber was able to attract light-weight

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  9. Chicken Sound Cup

    Chicken Sound Cup

    All you need is a piece of string and a plastic cup to make your own noisy, clucking chicken. Suitable for kids aged 4+ with parental supervision

    What You Need:

    • Plastic cup
    • Piece of string (approximately 40cm long)
    • Sharp pencil
    • Masking tape
    • Small piece of damp sponge (optional)

    What to do:

    1. Have an adult pierce a hoe in the top of the plastic cup using the sharp pencil.
    2. Thread the piece of string through the hole and tie a knot at the end so the string wont come back through the hole (as shown in the picture). If you have trouble tying the knot, try wrapping a piece of masking tape around the end of the string to stop it from coming back through the hole.
    3. To make your chicken cluck: wrap your wet fingers or a piece of damp cloth (if you have one) around the string near the mouth of the cup, then move your fingers/sponge down the length of the string, holding the cup firmly
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